french women

after a very indulgent christmas and new year period i am now gently thinking a little more purposefully about what i’m putting on my plate (see my previous post here for more ideas on this topic).   i know it’s very cliché but here in Paris – and especially here in the affluent ‘new money’ 16eme arrondissement – for the most part, french women don’t get fat.

walking around the neighbourhood one is not only exposed to the array of extremely well dressed men and women but those who are also tremendously slim.  a couple of times (even with my glasses on) from across a narrow street i was shocked to have mistaken a possibly 60-year-old woman for a woman in her 20s.  due to her dress sense and sheer size this woman performed a photoshop style optical illusion right before my eyes.

since this incident i have had my eyes peeled for such phenomena and have witnessed several more examples also from the male sector of the community. it cannot be denied that parisians are particularly good at this trick.

a lot of people say it’s about starving yourself, some say the french are just built lightly from the beginning and for others perhaps it’s the symptom of a hectic stressful working week.

however, mireille guiliano has different ideas, as demonstrated in a series of books i have been hooked on for some time now – french women don’t get fat.  a lot of the content speaks of portion control and nutritional awareness however she believes the most important aspect to getting rid of and keeping away unwanted extra weight is through the thorough enjoyment of the pleasure of eating. i like this concept a lot!  guilt and food always seems to be an unhealthy combination to me – for the body, mind and spirit.

she includes a handful of easy practical tips for the post holiday wind down too.  So, needless to say I am currently eagerly devouring mireille guiliano’s words and recipes from her french women don’t get fat cookbook.

you must read any one of her books for yourself to truly understand what this woman is about but i really believe that it’s her love and passion for delicious food that inspires me to eat more consciously.

i love this line of her biography,

mireille’s three favourite pastimes – breakfast, lunch and dinner

moi aussi, mirelle!

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2 Comments

Filed under food, personal, recipes, recommendations, reviews

2 responses to “french women

  1. Claire Molloy

    Hi Dani.
    This is definitely one of my favourite posts from your blog, as reading these books is one of my favourite pastimes:) My mum taught me to buy produce that is in season and “Mireille” clarified this with an emphasis on the pleasures of seasonality.
    I love cliché Paris, where we have images of that chic Parisienne women … Souci de soi !!

  2. Gem

    I was too tired and cranky during my one day visit to Paris so I didn’t notice the fashionable slim people though I’m sure they noticed unfashionable me. Before I got to Paris I was in Switzerland where I had the luxury of TIME. Andy and I walked around the strees of Lucerne and I remember thinking, wow, I feel very large. I didn’t see a single obese person.

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